Paleo Sweet Potato Bun

This paleo sweet potato bun is an excellent grain-free alternative to the traditional burger bun. Sweet potatoes are, in fact, the anti-bread. They offer sweet, carb-y goodness with more nutrient density and less inflammatory properties than the processed grain options on the market.

Let’s talk a little about me, and meat.

I am a reformed vegetarian. I started eating meat again about a year ago.  Before I became a vegetarian I was an incredibly picky eater. When I was younger I wouldn’t touch a burger with a ten foot stick. After my 5-year animal protein hiatus, I slowly started to reintroduce different types of meat into my diet. It started with fish, and subsequently chicken. Beef was something I was in no hurry to try. Several months ago, I had a grass-fed burger for the first time in my life.  It was surprisingly good. I was hooked. Normally, I eat burgers and sandwiches wrapped in lettuce or deconstructed on a bed of greens. I love a good lettuce wrapped burger, but those suckers are difficult to eat neatly. This sweet potato bun was created as an effort to offer a grain-free alternative the traditional burger bun.


Now, when you bite this paleo sweet potato bun, don’t expect it to taste like it’s the fluffy, airy, suagr-y, simple carbohydrate counterpart you might be used to. This is a dense bun made of sweet potatoes, understand that. With that being said, it is incredibly filling and adds an extra kick of healthy fat and protein from the eggs. And, who doesn’t love sweet potatoes.

Now, let’s get cooking.
You will need 4 mason jar lids, a pan, spatula and wax paper.

 

Paleo Sweet Potato Bun

  • Yield: 4 buns
  • Prep Time: 10 minutes
  • Cook Time: 18 minutes

The goods:

  • 1 medium sweet potato
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 tsp garlic powder
  • 1 tbsp + 1 tsp coconut oil
  • 1 tbsp almond meal or any ground nut meal
  • Salt and pepper
  • 1-2 tbsp water

The game plan:

  1. Begin by cutting off the ends of the sweet potato, and peeling the skin.

  2. Using the vegetable peeler, being peeling strips of the potato into the bowl. Do this until the entire sweet potato has been peeled into thin strips.

  3. In a pan, start heating up 1 tsp oil. Once the oil is hot, add the sweet potato strips. Allow them to cook, stirring occasionally and breaking into smaller pieces using a spatula. Add 1-2 tbsp of water to help the cooking process.

  4. In a bowl, whisk the eggs with the garlic powder, nut meal, and salt and pepper.

  5. Once sweet potato strips have softened (about 7-10 minutes), remove from the pan and add to the bowl with the eggs. Mix so that the egg mixture is now coating the sweet potatoes.

  6. Using mason jar lids, begin pressing the mixture into the ring. I placed the lid portion on the outside of the ring so that I could take it off while cooking, keeping the ring on. Pack the sweet potato mixture tightly,

  7. Place filled mason jar lids on wax paper, and place the refrigerator and allow to chill for at least 15 minutes.

  8. When ready to cook, start heating 1 tbsp oil in a pan. Allow oil to get hot, then add the buns will the rings still on. Brown each side of the buns, removing the rings when ready to flip (they might be hot so be careful). This step is mostly to crisp the outside, the sweet potatoes should be mostly cooked from step 3.

  9. Use for burgers, sandwiches or BLT's for a grain-free alternative!

Notes:

You can use a spiralizer instead of a vegetable peeler to get the sweet potato into strips. Because the strips are thinner than the noodles produced by the spiralizer, you will have to cook them longer in the pan before forming the buns.

Because of the natural sugars in the sweet potato, these burn easily during the frying process so watch carefully.

I used pistachio meal in my buns. Almond meal is easy to find in most stores, but you can make a nut flour/meal out of any nut by throwing it into a coffee grinder. It's role in this recipe is to aid in binding, so any mild tasting nut meal would work.

Consider adding Cheyenne pepper if you like a little kick.